Tag Archives: content

Facebook vs. LinkedIn

FBvsLI

Over the past year, a couple of my clients have begun making moves onto LinkedIn. Although they’ve been on board the Facebook train for sometime, they’ve decided to make the shift onto LinkedIn for a few reasons:

1. The Target Demo: The belief that this is where the older, affluent target demo lives online
2. The “Respectable” Platform: LinkedIn is associated with success and accomplishments; an opportunity for the brand to also associate with these things
3. The “Newness”: LinkedIn is still seen as relatively new and the audience is still growing

These are all perfect reasons why creating a brand presence on LinkedIn makes sense; however, does this mean that more effort should be put into LinkedIn rather than Facebook? In my opinion, no.

LinkedIn being still relatively new lacks a LOT of what Facebook has already spent years perfecting. I believe that Facebook still excels in three main areas: Audience insights (interests and usage), advertising (self-serve ads and better targeting), and finally media type publishing options. The back end of LinkedIn just does not compete – it’s incredibly basic, in the sense that knowing your audience and advertising to them is very limited. And next, on the front end, it is just no where near as aesthetic: photos are very hard to optimize for both desktop and mobile, and there are still no native video option.

Also… what’s sup with their news feed algorithm? It feels busy, and cluttered and just doesn’t makes sense seeing things from weeks ago beside recent updates. Just odd (and I know I’m not the only one who thinks their news feed could use some work).

For another perspective for the comparison, check out [this great infographic] specifically focusing on the advertising on both platforms.

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2013: The Year of the #Hashtag

blurred lines

Did you know that concept of the “hashtag” existed way before the existence of Twitter?

A “channel” is a term used to communicate with multiple people within an IRC (Internet Relay Chat) session, which are basically like chatrooms. To indicate a channel, the pre-fix “#” is used, and this symbol would collectively group and categorize topics within IRC networks. Complicated? Maybe. Luckily for us, this idea of grouping topics because much simpler with “The Hashtag”. Although Twitter was founded in 2006, the hashtag wasn’t introduced until 2007 (see tweet below), and did gain popularity until 2009. In 2010, trending topics were introduced, and it’s been history since then.

Chris-Messina-inventing-the-hashtag

So why am I claiming that 2013 is the year of the hashtag, even though it’s been out for so long you may ask…?

Well, bottom line, it’s gone mainstream. I feel as if once my Mom knows what a hashtag is, it’s mainstream. It’s on every news station, every television series, every billboard, every movie has one, every event you go to has one, and if you don’t have one, you’re missing out. Also this is the year that Facebook latched on. Although the Facebook hashtag has yet to prove useful or successful, it was news worthy. Other websites such as Pinterest, Google+, Tumblr, LinkedIn and of course Instagram and more have adopted the hashtag. All of these big web players make it easy to share and discuss these #topics.

To make matters worse, people are starting to talk in hashtags too… #ThisCanBeAnnoying – #ButAlsoPrettyFunny! Some people are sick of them, and some people refuse to hashtag anything now, but they’re still everywhere, and they aren’t going away anytime soon. #SorryNotSorry

instagram-hashtag

Later this week I’ll be revisiting the hashtag to discuss what hashtags can do for you, your business and in media. I would also like to visit some of the best hashtags used in advertising/marketing since it’s creation. Stay tuned!

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